Resources

Partnerscapes works to support collaborative conservation and public-private partnerships particularly from a landowner perspective.  In addition to our landowner forums, we have organized events that bring landowners and conservation partners together to learn how to work together more effectively in pursuit of common goals.  Stressing such attributes such as trust, respect, credibility and transparent communication between partners we have also developed reports and conducted other work that examines what participants in conservation partnerships find works best for them.  Below please find several reports that touch on the most basic aspects of diverse perspective conservation partnerships and collaborations

Collaborative Conservation Workshops - Boise, Idaho - August 2018
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Perspectives on Collaborative Conservation - Lessons Learned from the Greater Sage-Grouse Collaboration
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Living on the Edge - Private Lands Partners Day 2018 - Springfield, Missouri
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Private Lands Partnerships in a Public Lands State - Private Lands Partners Day 2019 - Ogden, UT
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Voluntary conservation through public-private partnerships is the largest, most diverse and fastest growing sector of natural resource work.  It involves local, state and federal entities from local conservation districts, to state fish and game agencies to federal efforts such as  the Conservation Title of the Farm Bill and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program.  The nonprofit, nongovernmental sector is also deeply engaged and diverse from local land trusts that work to conserve land through conservation easements to national organizations such as Pheasants Forever and The Nature Conservancy that work directly with landowners to address shared natural resource concerns. As a landowner, it doesn’t matter where you live in this country there are agencies and organizations that want to work with you to keep your lands working to benefit wildlife, fisheries and other natural resources as well as  the families and human communities that our working landscapes support.